Casual of Hiero Weighs in on Museum Controversy….Furious Styles is a Jerk.

Casual of Hiero Weighs in on Museum Controversy

I also applaud the people working with the development of the new Bronx museum. I really think its important in telling the story of Hip Hop aswell. I also think that Furious Styles is a Jerk.


(Casual is referring to the article we passed around earlier which is located here:
http://p076.ezboard.com/fpoliticalpalacefrm73.showMessage?topicID=20.topic

casual-HieroTo support the exclusion of Gangsta rap from a hip hop museum is like the act of excluding the mention of African Americans in the development process of America. His erroneous assessment of “gansta music” further proves his disconnection from our society. He is like a outsider looking in. “Gangsta Music” is the opposite side of the spectrum. The Yang to our Yin. A Museum with no mention of gangsta rap will receive no merit. Not even a room?.. a wall? Gangsta rap is the fuel pushing hip hop to the front of main stream music, It has enveloped and eclipsed your traditional “Positive Hip HOP” for many reasons, the main reason being,.. The aloof attitude of the positive hip-hopper.

Positive Hip Hoppers(for lack of a better term)or should I say hip hop optimist can always point you to a time when hip hop was better, more meaningful, and artist were more positive.
But truly there was no time like this, and if there was, it didnt last long. There is no evidence that there is more gangsta rap now than there was in the 1980. (And for any hip hop historian who wants to debate this,.. We can go song for song.)But there is evidence that gangsta rap has grown into a more lucrative commerce than “Artsy Rap”.

Here is a point I would like to make. Furious Styles shares the views of most Upper Middle Class, American-College educated Black Men. This problem you have with Gangsta rap mirrors the problem you have with the lower classes of society, your own Race, even your own less accomplished family members. This is western philosophy at its best. Bottom line is-you feel you are better than the people who achieved less. Do you believe the persons singing about Murder, Guns, Drugs, Sex, Mayhem, etc,. has know place in a museum of Hip Hop History?. You want to shelter you children from this awful exposure to reality like your hiding porn. But the truth is,… N.W.A. Can save your daughters life, So Can Justice-Ice, KRS-One, Tupac, Ice Cube and even listening to Too-Short Can Help your Daughters with their street smarts. And here is a quote for Furious Styles to further expose his insensitivity to your struggles;

I understand the age old worn out statement that Gansta Hip Hop is a product of the environment, its bigger than the thugs, pimps and playas, we dont own the planes that bring drugs into our communities, the-had- a- bad up bringing, no daddy in the house, being shot, the streets, etc. etc. etc.. etc.. But the fact of the matter is that these artists are pushing stripper music into the ears of our children, they are talking about crack selling, distribution, and murder, and wonder why we have so much violence in the lives of our youth.- Furious Styles

What is your major malfunction? Do you think living with no dad helps? Or being shot? Or having a bad upbringing? Surely your dad was there, you never been shot, and you had a good upbringing, that is why you are so insensitive to others reality. Your like a inconsiderate bitch.

And SO IS THIS WHY WE HAVE SO MUCH VIOLENCE? IS GANGSTA RAP THE REASON WERE IN IRAO OR AFGANISTAN? DID GANGSTA RAP PLAY A PART IN COLOMBINE OR WAKO? GANSTA RAP SURELY DIDNT BRING DOWN THE WORLD TRADE CENTER DID IT? AND IM SURE BLACK WALL STREET AND HEZBOLLAH HAVE SOME SORT OF CONNECTION?

And whos the Judge?

Is K.R.S.-One not a Gangsta? Did he release a album called Criminal Minded? Did he tote a Uzi On the cover of “My Philosophy?” Or is he afforded a period of time to change his views that now young artist wont be allowed?

Will Ice Cube Be in your Museum? He is definitely one of the most positive Artist to Date, Yet he grew from this most awful Gangsta rap, Bitches, Hoes etc…. Shall his efforts be slighted by your Museum?

On the other Hand Tupac? was he positive or a optimist or just a Soft Thug? who’s the person to say that a particular song or artist has know purpose universally?

Go ahead and build your little “Twinkle Toes” hip hop museum and “Georgie your own wee-wee”, But the truth is, The more divisions we place, the smaller each category gets, and leaving gangsta rap out of a hip hop museum confirms your intend to lie to your children, and your successors.

P.S. All of my releases have been positive by your standard,..bet i wont be in that bitch either,… some museum.

Casual of Hieroglyphics

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I Say Let them (Gangsta Rappers) Get There Own Museum

This article is in response to the recent controversy that emerged around the new Hip Hop Museum in New York. The city council which funded part of the museum is insisting that gangsta rap not be aprt of the exhibit. Here’s the article..
p076.ezboard.com/fpolitic…D=16.topic

I say Let them Get There Own Museum.
by Furious Styles

I applaud the people working with the development of the new Bronx museum. I really think its important in telling the story of Hip Hop, that we leave something for future generations to be proud of and to strive for. I believe wanting to be an emcee and to rock a party or have a good time, or to talk about yourself and how fly you are, or cleverly showing your battle ability without degrading people because of your lack of vocabulary, or talking about women and relationships in a nurturing and healthy way, or various societal issues is great. If you are a history of music, these songs with these topics and mood from the 60s and 70s are considered classics, and stand the test of time no matter what new microwave pop corn new act that pops up. Examples- Chage Gonna Come- Sam Cooke, Whats Going On- Marvin Gaye, Sweet Thing Chaka Khan.

But when you begin talking about or glorifying death, murder, mayhem, pimping, misogyny, incest, guns, cocaine, women as objects to just dance, or portray black people, or the Hip Hop generation as a group of people who live in the club, @#%$, fight, drink, steal, or do anything counterproductive to life, I feel firmly that you have no place in a museum, or in the history of Hip Hop, except in showing what was wrong with our culture, and how we should never have future generations go down that road but learn the lessons of history.

I understand the age old worn out statement that Gansta Hip Hop is a product of the environment, its bigger than the thugs, pimps and playas, we dont own the planes that bring drugs into our communities, the-had- a- bad up bringing, no daddy in the house, being shot, the streets, etc. etc. etc.. etc.. But the fact of the matter is that these artists are pushing stripper music into the ears of our children, they are talking about crack selling, distribution, and murder, and wonder why we have so much violence in the lives of our youth. Oh, by the way, what you listen to does make a difference on your psyche, mental health, self impression, everything. . Check out the movie where the dude at McDonalds for a month. If music is food, and you are what you eatThink about it.

If gangstas, pimps, playas, hustlas, tricks, ballers, killers, rapist, murderers, foul mouth imdividuals want a museum to display their works, let them build there own. But for me, I want my kids to take their kids to a museum where they can learn the importance of all the men and women on stage and behind the scenes that made Hip Hop music that had something to say, something to evoke and stimulate thought about life, family, the world, having fun, etc. And I hope my childrens children dont have to go somewhere where they have a Shrine for Nelly but none for Kool Herc, where theres the new track with Trina dissing Khia, but no ladies first by Queen Latifah, where there will be walls of shots of 50 cent, but no remembrance or understanding of Tupac. And yeah, Tupac would be in my museum and 50 wouldnt.

Again, for those of you who may have missed it, read the last 3 lines of the first paragraph. At least with Tupac he was well rounded, and had different dimensions to himself, and was able to challenge himself to talk about more than the bullshit. Most of these new dudes have no reference to Hip Hop history, and have nothing else to talk about. And great artists who have wonderful things to add in the world of music are labeled underground, cant get radio of video play, and are forced to watch people be destroyed for the lack of good musical food. Yeah I said it.

_Furious Styles

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X-Clan Urges People to Boycott World Trade Movie

BOYCOTT THIS MOVIE!!! EMAIL THIS TO YOUR ENTIRE LIST:

9-11areialview

It’s so natural for Hollywood to assume that every Hero is a White man.

by DJ Paradise Gray

Hollywood has always changed facts and edited history. From Charlton Heston
as Moses and Elizabeth Taylor as Cleopatra. They are only continuing their
tradition of White-washing our history. If they were able to portray Imhotep
(The Mummy and The Mummy Returns who was one of the greatest black Heroes of
all times and Jesus Christ as white without a single peep from our
community, why should this even matter to them in the least?

Situations like this will continue and we as Black people (or whatever you
want to consider yourself) will deserve what we get, unless we are willing
to stand up against tyranny and white supremacy.

Demand that this movie be taken out of theatures. Boycott this movie like
they attempted to boycott “Barbershop” show some community outrage like they
did for the poster of 50’s Get Rich Or Die trying. Cause the national media
to pick up this story.

Do something for a change. (Yes I’m talking to you!).

Paradise Gray
http://www.myspace.com/paradisegray
(Please forward to everyone on your email list, as the national press has
not or will not pick up this story)

Full story in The New Pittsburgh Courier
http://newpittsburghcourieronline.com/articlelive/articles/35730/1/World-Trade-Center-omits-Black-soldier/WTC-movies-unsung-hero.html

‘World Trade Center‘ omits Black Soldier

Following disasters of historically epic proportions like the attack on the
World Trade Center, there are bound to be countless tales of self-sacrifice,
heroism and triumph. Some stories, like those told in the movies Flight 93
and Oliver Stone’s World Trade Center, premiering Aug. 9, are made into
blockbusters for the world to see. Others are either whispered quietly among
family and friends or confined to the memories and souls of those who refuse
to speak of them.

Such is the tale of United States Marine Corps Sgt. Jason L. Thomas–in
spite of the fact that his story and the one told in World Trade Center are
one in the same.

THE STORY

The morning of Sept. 11, 2001 began like any other for Jason L. Thomas. A
student at the John Jay College of Criminal Justice of City University of
New York, he heard about the attack after taking his daughter to his
mother’s house in Queens so he could attend classes.

At the time I was saying to myself, That’s an attack. My mother looked at it
as if it was an accident, but one of the first things that came to my mind
was, They got us, he said.

Immediately after that, I just got in high gear. I had my uniform in my car,
my C-Bag. We just moved into a house, so I had a lot of my personal
equipment in my vehicle. I ran out to my car, got my uniform, got dressed
and shot to the city.

After a delay in Queens, which Thomas credits for keeping him away from the
collapse of the South Tower, he attached himself to a police convoy and made
it to the site within moments of the fall of the North Tower.

Approaching one of the towers, all I see is one at the time, I see the
building come crashing down. It just comes straight down. I park my vehicle
and I remember this cloud of smoke and ash just enveloped where I was. I
stuck my head down in my shirt and scooted behind my car and got on my
knees, but it engulfed the area. So I got up and I just ran in the direction
towards Ground Zero.

At Ground Zero, Thomas immediately began to help by fighting fires,
establishing triage sites to help the injured and assisting with the overall
evacuation. While his primary focus was devoted to the emergency, he
couldn’t help being affected by what had become of his city.

I know this beautiful city, and now here it is, it’s just rubble, he said.
There are fire engines on fire, and you don’t see that everyday–you don’t
see cars and ambulances on fire. I was just trying to take it in.

After hours of firefighting, assisting survivors and in some cases, praying
over the dead, Thomas ran into another marine, Staff Sgt. Dave Karnes.
Thomas presented a plan for a search and rescue mission of the area and he
and Karnes tried to enlist other soldiers on site to help. When they were
told the mission was too dangerous, they decided to go by themselves.

I found a couple guys, but it wasn’t enough, to them, to start a search and
rescue, he said. I remember myself and staff Sgt. Karnes saying, We’re going
to start the search and rescue with or without you, because someone needs
us.

THE MOVIE

The World Trade Center movie tells the story of the rescues of New York Port
Authority police officers John McLoughlin and Will Jimeno from Ground Zero,
as well as that of the men who rescued them. In real life, the officers were
rescued by sergeants Karnes and Thomas. In the film, however, they were
rescued by Karnes and PFC Dave Thomas; a composite character, played by
William Mapother, a white actor, who is meant to represent Thomas.

World Trade Center producer Michael Shamberg said that they knew about Sgt.
Thomas’s role in the rescue, but were unable to find him when creating the
film. He said producers didn’t discover Thomas was a Black man until after
they had started the movie. He also said that in spite of the fact that the
film was co-written by McLoughlin and Jimeno was consulted for authenticity,
no one ever asked them for a physical description of the man who helped save
their lives.

Frankly, we goofed–we learned when we were filming that he was an
African-American, said Shamberg. We would change it if we could. I actually
called him and apologized, and he said he didn’t mind. He was very gracious
about it.

Shamberg also apologized for another African-American officer, Bruce
Reynolds, who was also portrayed as white in the movie.

Thomas, meanwhile, didn’t learn the film was about his story until he saw
the unmistakable image of two marines peering into a whole at Ground Zero
during a commercial for the movie. He said that while he wasn’t angry about
how the film turned out, he does wish it could have been more realistic.

Full story in The New Pittsburgh Courier
http://newpittsburghcourieronline.com/articlelive/articles/35730/1/World-Trade-Center-omits-Black-soldier/WTC-movies-unsung-hero.html

———————————————————————————————–
Paradise Gray
Honorary Chairman, Pittsburgh LOC
National Political Hip-hop Convention
Grand Arkitech Of The BlackWatch Movement
Minister Of Arts And Sciences Millions More Movement
Director Of Almost Home Youth Ministries
One Hood
http://www.myspace.com/paradisegray

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